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St. Patty’s Day

March 17th, 2015

Luck of the Irish on St. Patrick's DaySt. Patty’s Day

We wish you the Luck of the Irish this St. Patty’s Day. Hopefully you had some fun this past weekend (or will be enjoying some tonight and throughout the week).

So, what is St. Patrick’s Day and why do they change the color of rivers to green?

Thank you to Wikipedia for a quick overview:

Saint Patrick’s Day or the Feast of Saint Patrick (Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, “the Day of the Festival of Patrick”) is a cultural and religious holiday celebrated annually on 17 March, the death date of the most commonly-recognized patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461).

Saint Patrick’s Day was made an official Christian feast day in the early seventeenth century and is observed by the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion (especially the Church of Ireland), the Eastern Orthodox Church and Lutheran Church. The day commemorates Saint Patrick and the arrival of Christianity in Ireland, as well as celebrates the heritage and culture of the Irish in general. Celebrations generally involve public parades and festivals, céilithe, and the wearing of green attire or shamrocks. Christians also attend church services, and the Lenten restrictions on eating and drinking alcohol are lifted for the day, which has encouraged and propagated the holiday’s tradition of alcohol consumption.

Although, we think the Irish of old would be a little shocked at our green beer.

An interesting bit of trivia is that the color of St. Patrick’s Day was originally blue. It morphed over to green over the years probably beginning with the 1798 Irish Rebellion when wearing a clover on a lapel became a sign. Shamrock is the Gaelic word for young clover. So when you look over a four-leafed clover, you can smile with the luck of the Irish.

If you’re interested in a local St. Patrick’s Day parade, you can start on the Wikipedia page just for St. Patrick’s Day in the US. Then click on the sub heading for Parades.

And our final bit of trivia is a bit of a tongue twister. The name of St. Patrick at birth was Maewyn Succat.

And if you’re wondering why some people wear orange, it’s because orange is the color that’s supposed to represent the Protestants. The Irish flag is green, white, then orange. Some say that the white is the hope for peace between the Catholics and Protestants.

And on that, we wish you a great weekend and a Happy St. Patrick’s Day this Tuesday.

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